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$2.99 eBook Sale: June 2020

$2.99 eBook Sale: June 2020

It’s time to gather up that summer reading stack, and we’re here to help with some discounted ebooks! Check out what books you can snag for only $2.99 throughout the ENTIRE month of June below!


Image Placeholder of - 8The Just City by Jo Walton

Created as an experiment by the time-traveling goddess Pallas Athene, the Just City is a planned community, populated by over ten thousand children and a few hundred adult teachers from all eras of history, along with some handy robots from the far human future—all set down together on a Mediterranean island in the distant past. Then, a few years in, Sokrates arrives—the same Sokrates recorded by Plato himself—to ask all the troublesome questions you would expect.

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Place holder  of - 95Scornful Stars by Richard Baker

Now a captain, Sikander Singh North commands the destroyer Decisive, assigned to Zerzura, a haven for piracy and the next playing-board in the Great Game. The Aquilan Commonwealth and the Empire of Dremark vie for the allegiance of local ruler Marid Pasha, a competition with stakes that reach far beyond the sector’s pirate-infested limits.

Sikander must stop the pirate attacks while charting his course between the ambitions of Marid Pasha, a dubious alliance with a shipping magnate, and the inexperience of Decisive’s crew…a situation that only grows more complicated when an old enemy returns.

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Image Place holder  of - 44In the Region of the Summer Stars by Stephen R. Lawhead

Ravaged by barbarian Scálda forces, the last hope for Eirlandia lies with the island’s warring tribes. Wrongly cast out of his tribe, Conor, the first-born son of the Celtic king, embarks on a dangerous mission to prove his innocence. What he discovers will change Eirlandia forever. For the Scálda have captured the mystical Fae to use as an ultimate weapon. And Conor’s own people have joined in the invasion.

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Poster Placeholder of - 85My Real Children by Jo Walton

Two lives, two worlds, two versions of modern history; each with their loves and losses, their sorrows and triumphs. Jo Walton’s My Real Children is the tale of both of Patricia Cowan’s lives…and of how every life means the entire world.

 

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Placeholder of  -13The Lord of Castle Black by Steven Brust

Journeys! Intrigues! Sword fights! Young persons having adventures! Beloved older characters having adventures, too! Quests! Battles! Romance! Snappy dialogue! Extravagant food! And the missing heir to the Imperial Throne!
In the swashbuckling, extravagant manner of The Phoenix Guards, Five Hundred Years After, and The Paths of the Dead, this is an old-fashioned adventure–moving at a twenty-first-century pace.

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The Parafaith War by L. E. Modesitt, Jr.

In the far future among the colonized worlds of the galaxy, there’s a war going on between the majority of civilized worlds and a colonial theocracy. Trystin Desoll grows up fighting against religious fanatics and becomes a hero, a first-class pilot, then, amazingly, a spy. What do you do if you’re a relatively humane soldier fighting millions of suicidal volunteers on the other side who know that they are utterly right and you are utterly wrong, with no middle ground?

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Splintegrate by Deborah Teramis Christian

One of the many charms of planet Lyndir is the Between-World, home to the licensed entertainers of the Sa’adani Empire. There, at a palatial house of domination called Tryst, professional dominatrix Kes has become a celebrity attraction whose fame and exclusivity draws a rarified clientele. Her most devoted client is Janus, a major crime boss on Lyndir and elsewhere. But when a high-powered imperial authority decides she wants Janus out of the way, she identifies Kes as his greatest vulnerability.

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On the Road: Tor/Forge Author Events in March

The Glass Arrow by Kristen SimmonsOf Irish Blood by Mary Pat KellyFinn Fancy Necromancy

Tor/Forge authors are on the road in March! Once a month, we’re collecting info about all of our upcoming author events. Check and see who’ll be coming to a city near you:

Ellen Datlow, The Doll Collection

Tuesday, March 10
Morbid Anatomy Museum
Books provided by WORD Bookstore.
Brooklyn, NY
7:00 PM

Monday, March 16
Jean Cocteau Cinema
Santa Fe, NM
6:30 PM

Saturday, March 21
Functionally Literate
Lowndes Shakespeare Center
Also with Pat Rushin and Teege Braune.
Orlando, FL
7:00 PM

James Grady, Last Days of the Condor

Wednesday, March 11
Barnes & Noble at The Catholic University of America
Washington, DC
6:00 PM

Randy Henderson, Finn Fancy Necromancy

Tuesday, March 3
Third Place Books
Lake Forest Park, WA
7:00 PM

Thursday, March 5
Village Books
Bellingham, WA
7:00 PM

Leanna Renee Hieber, The Eterna Files

Tuesday, March 3
Barnes & Noble
West Chester, OH
7:00 PM

Mary Pat Kelly, Of Irish Blood

Friday, March 6
Hackney’s On Lake
Songs and Stories with Catherine O’Connell
Glenview, IL
12:00 PM

Orland Park Public Library
Irish Tales and Tunes with Catherine O’Connell
Orland Park, IL
7:00 PM

Saturday, March 7
Irish American Heritage Center
Songs and Stories with Catherine O’Connell
Chicago, IL
1:00 PM

Monday, March 9
Evergreen Park Public Library
Evergreen Park, IL
6:30 PM

Wednesday, March 11
Anderson’s Bookshop
Naperville, IL
7:00 PM

Hank Phillippi Ryan, Truth Be Told

Thursday, March 26
West Boynton Branch Library
Boynton Beach, FL
2:00 PM

Kristen Simmons, The Glass Arrow

Saturday, March 7
NoVa Teen Book Festival
Washington-Lee High School
Books provided by One More Page Books.
Arlington, VA
2:00 PM

Wednesday, March 18
Inkwood Books
Tampa, FL
7:00 PM

Thursday, March 26
Joseph-Beth Booksellers
Crestview Hills, KY
7:00 PM

Jo Walton, The Just City

Monday, March 16
57th Street Books
Chicago, IL
6:30 PM

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Gods, Philosophers, and Robots

The Just City by Jo Walton
By Jo Walton

One of the odd things about explaining what The Just City is about is people’s reactions. The Just City is a fantasy novel about a group of classicists and philosophers from across all of time setting up Plato’s Republic on Atlantis, with the help of some Greek gods, ten thousand Greek-speaking ten-year-olds they bought in the slave markets of antiquity, and some construction robots from our near future. What could possibly go wrong?

Now I get two different immediate reactions to this. The first is from people who say “That’s insane, and I want it now!” The second is from people who say they know nothing about Plato or philosophy in a kind of apologetic way, as if anything that touches on these subjects in any way would require background reading and be kind of boring. When I said I’d written a book (Among Others) about growing up in South Wales and going to boarding school in England, with fairies, absolutely nobody said “I don’t know anything about South Wales” (or fairies, or boarding school) and I don’t think it’s because they had any more background knowledge of those things, I think it’s because there’s an odd kind of cringe before things that are “high culture” and which, without knowing anything about them, many people think are superior and many people secretly think are boring. And lots of people haven’t read Plato—which seems weird to me as I have been reading Plato since I was a kid (which is why I don’t share that cultural cringe) and totally immersed in Plato for the last eighteen months. But there are lots of things I am like that about. Proust, for example. Everyone says how great Proust is, but nobody says it is fun, and I’ve never even tried to read Proust, and even now thinking about it, I shrink away a little bit and think I’d be bored.

So if Plato is, for you, what Proust is for me, first, I think Plato is fun and readable and a weird mixture of brilliantly insightful and totally insane. And The Republic is supposedly a blueprint for a utopia, but it’s really apparent to anyone reading it that it would not work in practice because human nature. And yet… Plato wrote about gender equality two thousand and four hundred years ago. He wrote about striving for excellence, and justice. And The Republic is weirdly specific about some things and just as weirdly vague about others. For the characters caught up in it, it starts to seem completely normal, but a large part of philosophy is of course about questioning everything.

What I’ve written in The Just City is a utopia. No, a dystopia. No, wait, no… no, it’s not an ambiguous heterotopia either. But it’s about a designed society, and about human nature, and consent, and questioning. It’s about two women (and one god) growing up.

I had a lot of fun writing it, and I hope you’ll have fun reading it.

…………………………

From the Tor/Forge January newsletter. Sign up to receive our newsletter via email.

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More from the January Tor/Forge newsletter:

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Starred Review: The Just City by Jo Walton

The Just City by Jo Walton“As skilled in execution as it is fascinating in premise, Walton’s new work (after 2013’s My Real Children) doesn’t require a degree in classics, although readers might well be inspired to read Plato after seeing the rocky destruction of his dream. Although rich with philosophical discussions, what keeps this novel from becoming too chilly or analytical are its sympathetic female characters.”

Jo Walton’s The Just City got a starred review in Library Journal!

Here’s the full review, from the November 15 issue:

starred-review-gif A host of men and women who prayed to the goddess Athena are transported to the island of Kallisti (better known as Atlantis) to create a society based on the writings of Plato, specifically his concept of the Just City from The Republic. Intrigued by the experiment, Apollo, Athena’s brother, agrees to participate, allowing himself to be reborn as a mortal to grow up in Athena’s city. The older residents who prayed to be there serve as masters, mentors to the 10,000-plus children whom they steal out of time to populate the city, hoping those exposed early enough to Plato’s ideal society will grow up to become philosopher kings. The reality is more complicated, as utopian ideals rarely play out as expected on actual human beings. VERDICT As skilled in execution as it is fascinating in premise, Walton’s new work (after 2013’s My Real Children) doesn’t require a degree in classics, although readers might well be inspired to read Plato after seeing the rocky destruction of his dream. Although rich with philosophical discussions, what keeps this novel from becoming too chilly or analytical are its sympathetic female character.

The Just City will be published on January 13.

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Starred Review: The Just City by Jo Walton

The Just City by Jo Walton“The award-winning Walton has written a remarkable novel of ideas that demands—and repays—careful reading. It is itself an exercise in philosophy that often, courtesy of Socrates, critically examines Plato’s ideas. If this sounds abstruse, it sometimes is, but the plot is always accessible and the world building and characterization are superb. In the end, the novel more than does justice to the idea of the Just City.”

Jo Walton’s The Just City got a starred review in Booklist!

Here’s the full review, from the December 1 issue:

starred-review-gif Together with 300 scholars from 25 centuries, the goddess Athene sets out to establish Plato’s Republic and build the Just City on the backwater island of Kallisti, known to later generations as Atlantis. To populate it, she imports 10,080 10-year-olds, among them the slave girl Simmea and her friend and ultimate bête noire, Kebes. Another of the children is Pytheas, who is secretly the god Apollo in human form. Simmea and Apollo serve as two of the story’s three narrators; the third is a young woman, Maia, who comes from mid-Victorian England. The children’s raison d’être is to pursue excellence, to become their best selves and ultimately—if all goes well—Plato’s philosopher kings. Providing food and doing the work necessary to maintaining the island’s life is the role of robots imported from the distant future who serve as de facto slaves, a not insignificant point. Five years into the experiment, Socrates is brought to the island against his will to teach the children (now teenagers) rhetoric, and that’s when things get . . . interesting. The award-winning Walton has written a remarkable novel of ideas that demands—and repays—careful reading. It is itself an exercise in philosophy that often, courtesy of Socrates, critically examines Plato’s ideas. If this sounds abstruse, it sometimes is, but the plot is always accessible and the world building and characterization are superb. In the end, the novel more than does justice to the idea of the Just City.

The Just City will be published on January 13.

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