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The Lost Gate eBook is Now on Sale for $4.99

The Lost Gate by Orson Scott CardThe ebook for The Lost Gate by Orson Scott Card is now on sale for $4.99!*

About The Lost Gate: Danny North knew from early childhood that his family was different, and that he was different from them.  While his cousins were learning how to create the things that commoners called fairies, ghosts, golems, trolls, werewolves, and other such miracles that were the heritage of the North family, Danny worried that he would never show a talent, never form an outself.

He grew up in the rambling old house, filled with dozens of cousins, and aunts and uncles, all ruled by his father.  Their home was isolated in the mountains of western Virginia, far from town, far from schools, far from other people.

There are many secrets in the House, and many rules that Danny must follow.   There is a secret library  with only a few dozen books, and none of them in English — but Danny and his cousins are expected to become fluent in the language of the books.  While Danny’s cousins are free to create magic whenever they like, they must never do it where outsiders might see.

Unfortunately, there are some secrets kept from Danny  as well.  And that will lead to disaster for the North family.

sale ends December 5

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Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card The Lost Gate by Orson Scott Card Little Brother by Cory Doctorow For the Win by Cory Doctorow Truancy by Isamu Fukui Truancy Origins by Isamu Fukui Shadow Grail #1: Legacies by Mercedes Lackey and Rosemary Edghill Never Slow Dance with a Zombie by E. Van Lowe Inukami! Omnibus 1 Story by Mamizu Arisawa and Art by Mari Matsuzawa Libyrith by Pearl North The Boy from Ilysies by Pearl North Alosha by Christopher Pike The Comet's Curse by Dom Testa The Web of Titan by Dom Testa The Cassini Code by Dom Testa The Dark Zone by Dom Testa Jack: Secret Histories by F.Paul Wilson Jack: Secret Circles by F. Paul Wilson Jack: Secret Vengeance by F. Paul Wilson The City of Fire by Laurence Yep

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NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You must be 18 or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C. to enter. Promotion begins April 11, 2011 at 12 a.m. ET. and ends May 3, 2011, 11:59 p.m. ET. Void in Puerto Rico and wherever prohibited by law. For Official Rules and to enter, go to www.tor-forge.com/tor/promo/teenlibraryprizepack. Sponsor: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

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Mapping Worlds in The Lost Gate

Placeholder of  -61By Orson Scott Card

Sometimes you know when you’re onto something big. It was the same year that “Ender’s Game” appeared in Analog—my first sci-fi publication. I was working with Ben Bova, and the stories I was selling all had spaceships and rivets and machines. But in my heart, what I loved was fantasy.

No, let’s be more precise: What I loved was Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and George Macdonald’s The Light Princess and C. S. Lewis’s Till We Have Faces and Michael Crichton’s Eaters of the Dead and Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd and John Hersey’s White Lotus and Miller’s A Canticle for Leibowitz and Crowley’s The Deep and Peake’s Ghormengast.

Wait. Some of those are only barely fantasy, and two of them aren’t fantasy at all!

But that’s because at the time I’m talking about—1977—fantasy didn’t really exist as a genre. It was still being invented. The only commercially successful fantasy that wasn’t by Tolkien was Brooks’s The Sword of Shannara, and it was so clearly derivative of Lord of the Rings that it only convinced me that it was vital that any fantasy I wrote not take place in a universe that resembled Tolkien’s.

I wanted to create something that had the same effect on readers as Tolkien’s work—that sense of having been immersed in a real world, deep and rich and dangerous and dark, but with islands of light—without having to lean on anybody else’s invention.

I wanted my fiction to be as original as Crowley’s and Peake’s, as morally insightful and challenging as Lewis’s and Miller’s, as thickly and richly created as Hardy’s and Hersey’s and Crichton’s, and as filled with tragic joy as Macdonald’s and Tolkien’s.

And then I drew this map. As with Treason, Hart’s Hope, and The Worthing Chronicle, which all began with maps I doodled (and unlike the many hundreds of maps that have not led to books or stories), this map set me to daydreaming. I created a whole historical atlas of this world, along with changing names as the languages evolved.

And into this world I pushed a magic system I had been toying with, again in my daydreams of fiction. (Lots of daydreaming in those days—I wasn’t married yet, I lived alone. I spent most of my free time with only my imagination for company, and we kept up a constant stream of conversation with each other.)

It was an animistic magic system in which power is granted to mages voluntarily, by the creatures or elements that the mage disciplined himself to serve. Trees would do strange and powerful things for you—if you truly loved them and served their interests and came to understand what they could do and how and why.

I tried it out in the short story “Sandmagic,” and then…

And then I waited. Because it was too big. The ramifications were too deep. It was too important to me. I had to wait until I was a better writer, with more experience, more knowledge of the real world, more understanding of everything.

The idea grew until I had a magical explanation for pretty much everything. All the religions of our world, all the supernatural manifestations that are believed in by anybody. And somehow I had to tell a story about real people moving through our present world (“Mittlegard”) and that highly mapped fantasy world (“Westil”).

A third of a century after the map and the magic first came to me, I have, with The Lost Gate, the first book-length exploration of that world and the powers at work in it. I hope I’m doing it justice. For its origin is in those early days when the modern commercial genre of fantasy had not yet been invented.

The Lost Gate (ISBN: 978-0-7653-2657-7; $7.99) by Orson Scott Card is available from Tor in January. Orson Scott Card can be found online at hatrack.com.

…………………………

From the Tor/Forge January newsletter. Sign up to receive our newsletter via email.

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Book Trailer: The Lost Gate by Orson Scott Card

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About THE LOST GATE: Danny North knew from early childhood that his family was different, and that he was different from them.  While his cousins were learning how to create the things that commoners called fairies, ghosts, golems, trolls, werewolves, and other such miracles that were the heritage of the North family, Danny worried that he would never show a talent, never form an outself.

He grew up in the rambling old house, filled with dozens of cousins, and aunts and uncles, all ruled by his father.  Their home was isolated in the mountains of western Virginia, far from town, far from schools, far from other people.

There are many secrets in the House, and many rules that Danny must follow.   There is a secret library  with only a few dozen books, and none of them in English — but Danny and his cousins are expected to become fluent in the language of the books.  While Danny’s cousins are free to create magic whenever they like, they must never do it where outsiders might see.

Unfortunately, there are some secrets kept from Danny as well.  And that will lead to disaster for the North family.

Sweepstakes: Ender’s Shadow Limited Edition

Sign up for the Tor/Forge Newsletter for a chance to win a limited edition leatherbound copy of Ender’s Shadow. Plus, we’ll include an Ender’s Shadow audiobook and an advance reading copy of The Lost Gate with the winner’s prize:

Place holder  of - 93 Poster Placeholder of - 26

Please note, the Ender’s Shadow limited edition is from the Tor archives and has been opened. There is no plastic seal on it.

About our newsletter: every issue of Tor’s monthly email newsletter features original writing by, and interviews with, Tor authors and editors about upcoming new titles from all Tor and Forge imprints. In addition, we occasionally send out “special edition” newsletters to highlight particularly exciting new projects, programs, or events.

If you’re already a newsletter subscriber, you can enter too. We do not automatically enter subscribers into giveaways. We promise we won’t send you duplicate copies of the newsletter if you sign up more than once.

Sign up for your chance to win today!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You must be 18 or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C. to enter. Promotion begins December 1, 2010 at 12 a.m. ET. and ends January 4, 2011, 11:59 p.m. ET. Void in Puerto Rico and wherever prohibited by law. For Official Rules and to enter, go to www.tor-forge.com/tor/promo/endersshadowlimed. Sponsor: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

Sweepstakes: Ender’s Game Limited Edition

Sign up for the Tor/Forge Newsletter for a chance to win a limited edition leatherbound copy of Ender’s Game. Plus, we’ll include an Ender’s Game audiobook and an advance reading copy of The Lost Gate with the winner’s prize:

Image Placeholder of - 81 Poster Placeholder of - 2

Please note, the Ender’s Game limited edition is from the Tor archives and has been opened. There is no plastic seal on it.

About our newsletter: every issue of Tor’s monthly email newsletter features original writing by, and interviews with, Tor authors and editors about upcoming new titles from all Tor and Forge imprints. In addition, we occasionally send out “special edition” newsletters to highlight particularly exciting new projects, programs, or events.

If you’re already a newsletter subscriber, you can enter too. We do not automatically enter subscribers into giveaways. We promise we won’t send you duplicate copies of the newsletter if you sign up more than once.

Sign up for your chance to win today!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You must be 18 or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C. to enter. Promotion begins November 1, 2010 at 12 a.m. ET. and ends December 2, 2010, 11:59 p.m. ET. Void in Puerto Rico and wherever prohibited by law. For Official Rules and to enter, go to www.tor-forge.com/tor/promo/endersgamelimed. Sponsor: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

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