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Chasers of the Wind by Alexey PehovChernobyl by Frederik PohlDance in the Vampire Bund: Forgotten Tales by Nozomu TamakiFlight of the Golden Harpy by Susan KlausGakuen Polizi Vol. 1 by  Morinaga MilkGirl of Nightmares by Kendare BlakeHaganai: I Don’t Have Many Friends Vol. 7 by Yomi Hirasaka, art by ItachiStrike Witches: The Sky That Connects Us by Humikane Shimada, art by Yuuki Tanaka

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Throwback Thursdays: The Best, Worst, and BESTWORST Stephen King Adaptations

Welcome to Throwback Thursdays on the Tor/Forge blog! Every other week, we’re delving into our newsletter archives and sharing some of our favorite posts.

On September 10th, Kendare Blake begins a brand new series with the first book in The Goddess Wars, Antigoddess. With Antigoddess, Kendare brings her talent for horror to a whole new world, so to celebrate, we thought we’d dip into our archives and share an article she wrote in August 2012, for the publication of Anna Dressed in Blood. Enjoy this blast from the past, and be sure to check back every other Thursday for more!

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Written by Kendare Blake

A couple of months ago, a friend and I were talking about Stephen King adaptations (they were running Stephen King with Story Notes on AMC that week) and got to wondering exactly how many movies had been made from his work. We were able to name so many: Carrie, The Shining, The Stand, Cujo, Misery, The Tommyknockers, Hearts in Atlantis; we could go on and on.

“How many books has the guy written?” my friend wanted to know. “I wonder what percentage have been made into movies?”

So I said, let’s count. “And remember, it’s not only King novels, but short stories that have to be tallied. Movies have been made from short stories, too. 1408, for example. And we might want to track which works have been optioned for film without ever being produced.”

“You’re getting too involved in this,” my friend said.

Based on the rough and lazy count that followed, we arrived at this rough and lazy answer: Stephen King writes a lot of stuff, and a lot of that stuff gets made into movies. Pick up a short story collection, and somewhere inside, a film awaits. The novels are probably optioned before they’re even written. When will we see a movie version of Under The Dome or 11/22/63? The answer?

Someday. Probably. Odds are looking good.

This conversation got me thinking about the best and worst Stephen King adaptations, and I thought I’d share my list, including a special category for the BESTWORST adaptation. And oh yeah, there will probably be spoilers. Here we go.

THE BEST

Stand By Me

Raise your hand if you thought I was going to say The Shawshank Redemption. Ha! Well I didn’t. That would’ve been the obvious choice. Instead I say that this tale, adapted from King’s pensive novella “The Body” does all the things that King does best in his non-supernatural work: it studies the transitory nature of childhood friendships; short-lived but often the most memorable of your life. It’s a beautiful, careful film, carried along by genuine good times and undercut with the constant menace of knowing these kids are in real danger.

THE WORST

Dreamcatcher

Raise your hand if you thought I was going to say Maximum Overdrive. Well I didn’t. I like Maximum Overdrive. It’s hilarious.

No, my vote has to go to Dreamcatcher, a big pile of turd of a movie, complete with horrible CGI aliens that go up your butt and I don’t know, incubate until you poo them out again. If Ridley Scott’s aliens had taken this route, we would never have been able to watch Prometheus, because no other Alien movies would have been made.

Right now, Dreamcatcher is whispering in my ear about how good the acting was, by Jason Lee and Thomas Jane and Damian Lewis and heck, even Morgan Freeman. It’s telling me that the strong childhood friendships are back in abundance. But dammit, no, Dreamcatcher! Just, no.

THE BESTWORST

I was tempted to say Riding the Bullet, because it’s laughably watchable on a Sunday afternoon. And I do recommend you see it, because it’s great watching David Arquette try to make those scary faces. But in my mind, the BESTWORST Stephen King adaptation will always be the 1990 TV miniseries of IT.

I love IT. I own IT, and once a year I order Chinese food and watch IT, and eat right at the part where they get to the Chinese restaurant, because the eyeball in the fortune cookie always makes me giggle. It’s terrible, and fantastic, and features a pre-puberty Seth Green, and a just slightly post puberty John Boy Walton. Is it scary? Not exactly. But Tim Curry flashing between those hanging white bed sheets is undeniably one more reason to distrust clowns.

So there you have it. My list. With so many films based on King’s work, I expect that few will agree with my choices. I invite you to make your case for your own.

It’s important to note that this list is reflective of the movies only, not the works on which they were based. While I don’t doubt that these days King could have a lot of input on how his tales are adapted, I also don’t doubt that for many of these films he had little control, just like most authors. Someday, it would be cool if Anna Dressed in Blood was adapted, and I could be one of those no-control authors. But in case it doesn’t, here’s a short Best/Worst/BestWorst list of possibilities:

Best: Anna Dressed in Awesome: Directed by the dream team of Joss Whedon and Tim Burton, from an adapted screenplay by Neil Gaiman, a dark, visceral tale with undertones the book didn’t even think of and visuals to kill for.

Worst: Anna Dressed in a Red Dress: Anna reimagined as a 1940’s crime noir, in which Anna is a deranged socialite who murders her wealthy stepfather. Hard-boiled private detective Cas Lowood must run down the mystery in a dark coat and one of those hats. Starring an undiscovered Hemsworth brother and a rapidly aging Kardashian sister.

BestWorst: Anna Dressed in Blood: The Musical.

This article is originally from the August 2012 Tor/Forge newsletter. Sign up for the Tor/Forge newsletter now, and get similar content in your inbox twice a month!

Not at San Diego Comic-Con Sweepstakes

Tor Books is heading to San Diego Comic-Con!

Poster Placeholder of - 90We hope to see many of you there. Stop by Booth #2707 to say hi or to participate in one of our many events and signings.

But for those of you who couldn’t make it out to California, we wanted to offer you the chance to grab some of the same amazing swag and books that we’re promoting at #SDCC. To enter for the chance to win one of these five prize bundles, leave a comment on this post telling us one fabulous thing that you’ll be doing this week while you are #NotAtComicCon. Whether you’re battling Dragon Army, matching wits with Tyrion Lannister, or chauffeuring your kids to soccer practice, we hope that you have a wonderful week.

Here’s a look at the prize:

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And here’s a list of what’s included in each prize bundle:

  • Ender’s Game movie poster
  • Ender’s Game T-shirt and cap
  • Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  • The Way of Kings quote magnets
  • Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake
  • Article 5 by Kristen Simmons
  • The Eternity Artifact by L. E. Modesitt, Jr.
  • The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
  • The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel: Volume 3 based on the novel by Robert Jordan, written by Chuck Dixon, and illustrated by Marcio Fiorito and Francis Nuguit
  • Forge of Darkness by Steven Erikson
  • Girl Genius Omnibus Volume One by Phil Foglio and Kaja Foglio
  • Halo: Glasslands by Karen Traviss
  • Homeland by Cory Doctorow
  • The Hum and the Shiver by Alex Bledsoe
  • The Human Division by John Scalzi
  • Hunters of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
  • Ironskin by Tina Connolly
  • Johnny Hiro: Half Asian, All Hero by Fred Chao
  • London Falling by Paul Cornell
  • The Omen Machine by Terry Goodkind
  • River Road by Suzanne Johnson
  • Sea Change by S. M. Wheeler
  • The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman and Jay Bonansinga
  • Wild Cards I edited by George R. R. Martin

Plus, one winner will receive this display exclusive – a Redshirts booth poster!

Redshirts SDCC Booth Display Poster

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You must be 18 or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C. to enter. Promotion begins July 18, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. ET. and ends July 22, 2013, 12:00 p.m. ET. Void in Puerto Rico and wherever prohibited by law. Please see full details and official rules go here. Sponsor: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

Find Tor Books at BEA!

Find Tor Books at BEA!

BEABook Expo America 2013 takes place in New York City from May 29th to June 1st and we’ll be there! Take a look below to see which Tor authors, editors, and more will be appearing. Meet Brandon Sanderson, Ellen Datlow, Kendare Blake, and more!

Tor Books will also be present in the Macmillan section at booth 1557 for the entirety of the conference. Stop by and say hello!

Wednesday May 29th

  • Book Blogger Conference Editor Insight Panel with Patrick Nielsen Hayden, Senior Editor at Tor Books (Location TBD). 10:10am-11am.
  • Children’s Librarians Dinner w/Kendare Blake (Anna Dressed in Blood, Antigoddess). 7pm-9pm at the Princeton Club of NY, 15 W. 43rd Street.

Thursday May 30th

Author Signings at Autographing Area (Tor Table #17)

  • Kendare Blake (Anna Dressed in Blood, Antigoddess) 9:30 am-10:30am
  • Dan Krokos (Planet Thieves) 11:30am-12:30pm
  • Brandon Sanderson (The Way of Kings, The Rithmatist) 2pm-3pm (Note: This event is ticketed.)

Friday May 31th

Horror Writers of America Signing at Table #24

  • Ellen Datlow (Queen Victoria’s Book of Spells, Tor.com) 2:30pm-3:30pm

Signings at Booth 1557

  • Brandon Sanderson (The Way of Kings, The Rithmatist) 3:00-4:30pm

Author Signings at Autographing Area (Tor Table #17)

  • V.E. Schwab (Viscious) 2pm-3pm
  • Edward Lazellari (The Lost Prince) 3pm-4pm

Ghost Collection Sweepstakes

Ghost Collection Sweepstakes

Sign up for the Tor/Forge Newsletter for a chance to win the following collection:

Poster Placeholder of - 36

About our newsletter: Every issue of Tor’s monthly email newsletter features original writing by, and interviews with, Tor authors and editors about upcoming new titles from all Tor and Forge imprints. In addition, we occasionally send out “special edition” newsletters to highlight particularly exciting new projects, programs, or events.

If you’re already a newsletter subscriber, you can enter too. We do not automatically enter subscribers into sweepstakes. We promise we won’t send you duplicate copies of the newsletter if you sign up for the newsletter more than once.

Sign up for your chance to win today!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You must be 18 or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C. to enter. Promotion begins October 1, 2012 at 12 a.m. ET. and ends October 31, 2012, 11:59 p.m. ET. Void in Puerto Rico and wherever prohibited by law. For Official Rules and to enter, go here. Sponsor: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

Announcing the Girls’ Nightmare Out #TorChat!

Announcing Girls’ Nightmare Out!

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August spells the end of glorious summer days and the return of classrooms and assigned reading. What better way to celebrate the end of summer than with a Young Adult #TorChat, followed by a one-of-a-kind tour!

Tor Books (@torbooks) is thrilled to announce Girls’ Nightmare Out, a week-long event featuring three amazing YA authors: Lisa Desrochers, Kendare Blake, and Marta Acosta!

Girls’ Nightmare Out will launch with the August #TorChat, part of a monthly series of genre-themed, hour-long chats created by Tor Books and hosted on Twitter. The chat will take place on next Wednesday, August 15th, from 4 to 5 PM Eastern. As students all across the country try to squeeze in just one more fun book before picking up their textbooks again, we’ll be joined by Lisa Desrochers (@LisaDez), the author of the Personal Demons trilogy, whose final volume, Last Rite, was published in May; Kendare Blake (@KendareBlake), whose debut took readers and critics alike by storm and whose new novel, Girl of Nightmares, a genre-bending love story drenched in blood and terror, publishes in August; and Marta Acosta (@MartaAcosta), author of the popular Casa Dracula series, as well as her YA debut, the gothic Dark Companion, published on July 3, 2012.

The chat will be loosely moderated by Katie Bartow, the blogger behind Mundie Moms, a popular YA review site. Katie founded Mundie Moms in January 2009 as a place for fans to discuss their favourite YA novels. From there, it grew into a community of fans and reviewers discussing every aspect of YA fiction and chatting with YA authors. Follow the chat and join in by using the Twitter hashtag #TorChat!

In the week following the chat, Girls’ Nightmare Out will take to the road, with Lisa, Kendare, and Marta going on a week-long tour, hitting cities all across the country! Dates and details are on Tor.com.

About the Authors

LISA DESROCHERS burst onto the YA scene in September 2010 with her debut novel Personal Demons, which was an ALA/YALSA Popular Paperback for Young Adults nominee and a Library Journal “Fall First” selection. Desrochers second installment Original Sin was highly anticipated and received rave reviews. And now Tor is proud to announce the release of the conclusion to the thrilling, edgy Personal Demons series, Last Rite, published on May 5, 2012.

With the help of the powerful angel Gabe and demon-turned-mortal Luc, Frannie has been able to stay one step ahead of the forces of Hell. But when the demons killed Frannie’s best friend and destroyed her brother, they raised the stakes. If Frannie wants to keep her family and friends safe, she knows she has no choice but to go on the run. Their best defense is the power Frannie has been struggling to master, but her attempts to hone her skill go horribly awry. If Frannie doesn’t learn fast, the consequences could be devastating—even apocalyptic. What happens when you can’t outrun Hell…or trust the ones you love?

Lisa lives in central California with her husband and two very busy daughters. She has a doctorate in physical therapy and maintains a full time practice. Last Rite is the final installment in the Personal Demons series.

KENDARE BLAKE exploded onto the Young Adult scene with her debut novel, Anna Dressed in Blood. Enthralling New York Times bestselling authors, reviewers, fans, and bloggers alike, Blake adeptly weaves the familiar and the unexpected into a genre-bending, refreshing new take on paranormal romance. Now, she’s back with her eagerly anticipated sequel, Girl of Nightmares, publishing on August 7, 2012.

It’s been months since the ghost of Anna Korlov opened a door to Hell in her basement and disappeared into it, but ghost-hunter Cas Lowood can’t move on. His friends remind him that Anna sacrificed herself so that Cas could live—not walk around half dead. He knows they’re right, but in Cas’s eyes, no living girl he meets can compare to the dead girl he fell in love with. Now he’s seeing Anna everywhere: sometimes when he’s asleep and sometimes in waking nightmares. But something is very wrong…These aren’t just daydreams. Anna seems tortured, torn apart in new and ever more gruesome ways every time she appears. Cas doesn’t know what happened to Anna when she disappeared into Hell, but he knows she doesn’t deserve whatever is happening to her now. Anna saved Cas more than once, and it’s time for him to return the favor.

Kendare holds an MA in Creative Writing from Middlesex University in northern London. She lives and writes in Lynnwood, Washington. Anna Dressed in Blood was among NPR’s Top 5 YA Novels of 2011, ALA/YALSA’s Best Fiction for Young Adults 2011 as well as Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers 2011, and Kirkus Reviews’ Best Teen Books of 2011. It was also recognized by the Cybils: Children’s and Young Adult Bloggers’ Literary Awards.

MARTA ACOSTA is the award-winning author of the Casa Dracula series, all of which have hit #1 on Amazon’s Latino Author’s list. Now, Tor Teen is excited to announce the publication of her very first YA novel, the gothic Dark Companion, publishing on July 3, 2012.

Written as an homage to Jane Eyre, Dark Companion is a lush, romantic tale about an orphaned teenager who is chosen to attend an exclusive private school where things are not exactly as they seem. It was originally published on Scrib.com where it garnered over 25,000 reads and became the top YA novel on the site, which was reported by GalleyCat, the New Yorker’s blog, io9.com, and Publishers Weekly. Recently, it was chosen as a selection for the Las Comadres National Latino Book Club for August 2012.

Marta’s novels have been selected as Book Sense, BookPage Notable and Fresh Fiction picks and a Catalina Magazine Humor Book of the Year. In addition to writing fiction, she is a frequent contributor to the San Francisco Chronicle, Publishers Weekly and Contra Costa Times. Marta lives in the San Francisco Bay area with her family.

About #Torchat
#TorChat is a genre-themed, hour-long chat series created by Tor Books and hosted on Twitter. Guest authors join fans in lively, informative and entertaining discussions of all that’s hot in genre fiction, 140 characters at a time, from 4 – 5 PM EST on the third Wednesday of every month. Each #TorChat revolves around a different genre topic of interest, often of a timely nature, and strives to provide a new media opportunity for readers to connect with their favorite authors.

About Tor Books
Tor Books, an imprint of Tom Doherty Associates, LLC, is a New York-based publisher of hardcover and softcover books. Founded in 1980, Tor annually publishes what is arguably the largest and most diverse line of science fiction and fantasy ever produced by a single English-language publisher. In 2002, Tor launched Starscape, an imprint dedicated to publishing quality science fiction and fantasy for young readers, including books by critically acclaimed and award winning authors such as Cory Doctorow, Orson Scott Card, and David Lubar. Between an extensive hardcover and trade-softcover line, an Orb backlist program, and a stronghold in mass-market paperbacks, books from Tor have won every major award in the SF and fantasy fields, and has been named Best Publisher 25 years in a row in the Locus Poll, the largest consumer poll in SF.

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The Best, Worst, and BESTWORST Stephen King Adaptations

Tor/Forge Blog

Girl of Nightmares by Kendare Blake

Written by Kendare Blake

A couple of months ago, a friend and I were talking about Stephen King adaptations (they were running Stephen King with Story Notes on AMC that week) and got to wondering exactly how many movies had been made from his work. We were able to name so many: Carrie, The Shining, The Stand, Cujo, Misery, The Tommyknockers, Hearts in Atlantis; we could go on and on.

“How many books has the guy written?” my friend wanted to know. “I wonder what percentage have been made into movies?”

So I said, let’s count. “And remember, it’s not only King novels, but short stories that have to be tallied. Movies have been made from short stories, too. 1408, for example. And we might want to track which works have been optioned for film without ever being produced.”

“You’re getting too involved in this,” my friend said.

Based on the rough and lazy count that followed, we arrived at this rough and lazy answer: Stephen King writes a lot of stuff, and a lot of that stuff gets made into movies. Pick up a short story collection, and somewhere inside, a film awaits. The novels are probably optioned before they’re even written. When will we see a movie version of Under The Dome or 11/22/63? The answer?

Someday. Probably. Odds are looking good.

This conversation got me thinking about the best and worst Stephen King adaptations, and I thought I’d share my list, including a special category for the BESTWORST adaptation. And oh yeah, there will probably be spoilers. Here we go.

THE BEST

Stand By Me

Raise your hand if you thought I was going to say The Shawshank Redemption. Ha! Well I didn’t. That would’ve been the obvious choice. Instead I say that this tale, adapted from King’s pensive novella “The Body” does all the things that King does best in his non-supernatural work: it studies the transitory nature of childhood friendships; short-lived but often the most memorable of your life. It’s a beautiful, careful film, carried along by genuine good times and undercut with the constant menace of knowing these kids are in real danger.

THE WORST

Dreamcatcher

Raise your hand if you thought I was going to say Maximum Overdrive. Well I didn’t. I like Maximum Overdrive. It’s hilarious.

No, my vote has to go to Dreamcatcher, a big pile of turd of a movie, complete with horrible CGI aliens that go up your butt and I don’t know, incubate until you poo them out again. If Ridley Scott’s aliens had taken this route, we would never have been able to watch Prometheus, because no other Alien movies would have been made.

Right now, Dreamcatcher is whispering in my ear about how good the acting was, by Jason Lee and Thomas Jane and Damian Lewis and heck, even Morgan Freeman. It’s telling me that the strong childhood friendships are back in abundance. But dammit, no, Dreamcatcher! Just, no.

THE BESTWORST

I was tempted to say Riding the Bullet, because it’s laughably watchable on a Sunday afternoon. And I do recommend you see it, because it’s great watching David Arquette try to make those scary faces. But in my mind, the BESTWORST Stephen King adaptation will always be the 1990 TV miniseries of IT.

I love IT. I own IT, and once a year I order Chinese food and watch IT, and eat right at the part where they get to the Chinese restaurant, because the eyeball in the fortune cookie always makes me giggle. It’s terrible, and fantastic, and features a pre-puberty Seth Green, and a just slightly post puberty John Boy Walton. Is it scary? Not exactly. But Tim Curry flashing between those hanging white bed sheets is undeniably one more reason to distrust clowns.

So there you have it. My list. With so many films based on King’s work, I expect that few will agree with my choices. I invite you to make your case for your own.

It’s important to note that this list is reflective of the movies only, not the works on which they were based. While I don’t doubt that these days King could have a lot of input on how his tales are adapted, I also don’t doubt that for many of these films he had little control, just like most authors. Someday, it would be cool if Anna Dressed in Blood was adapted, and I could be one of those no-control authors. But in case it doesn’t, here’s a short Best/Worst/BestWorst list of possibilities:

Best: Anna Dressed in Awesome: Directed by the dream team of Joss Whedon and Tim Burton, from an adapted screenplay by Neil Gaiman, a dark, visceral tale with undertones the book didn’t even think of and visuals to kill for.

Worst: Anna Dressed in a Red Dress: Anna reimagined as a 1940’s crime noir, in which Anna is a deranged socialite who murders her wealthy stepfather. Hard-boiled private detective Cas Lowood must run down the mystery in a dark coat and one of those hats. Starring an undiscovered Hemsworth brother and a rapidly aging Kardashian sister.

BestWorst: Anna Dressed in Blood: The Musical.

…………………………

From the Tor/Forge August newsletter. Sign up to receive our newsletter via email.

…………………………

More from the August Tor/Forge newsletter:

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Book Trailer: Girl of Nightmares by Kendare Blake

Tor/Forge Blog

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Girl of Nightmares by Kendare Blake

It’s been months since the ghost of Anna Korlov opened a door to Hell in her basement and disappeared into it, but ghost-hunter Cas Lowood can’t move on.

His friends remind him that Anna sacrificed herself so that Cas could live—not walk around half dead. He knows they’re right, but in Cas’s eyes, no living girl he meets can compare to the dead girl he fell in love with.

Now he’s seeing Anna everywhere: sometimes when he’s asleep and sometimes in waking nightmares. But something is very wrong…these aren’t just daydreams. Anna seems tortured, torn apart in new and ever more gruesome ways every time she appears.

Cas doesn’t know what happened to Anna when she disappeared into Hell, but he knows she doesn’t deserve whatever is happening to her now. Anna saved Cas more than once, and it’s time for him to return the favor.

Girl of Nightmares, by Kendare Blake, releases August 7th!

Not at San Diego Comic-Con Sweepstakes

Tor/Forge Blog

Tor Books is heading to San Diego Comic-Con!

Image Place holder  of - 84We hope to see many of you there. Stop by Booth #2707 to say hi or to participate in one of our many events and signings.

But for those of you who couldn’t make it out to California, we wanted to offer you the chance to grab some of the same amazing swag and books that we’re promoting at #SDCC. To enter for the chance to win one of these five prize bundles, leave a comment on this post telling us one fabulous thing that you’ll be doing this week while you are #NotAtComicCon. Whether you’re fighting a clone army, rescuing damsels in distress (or princelings in peril), zipping across galaxies at light speed, or just conquering your laundry pile, we hope that you have a great week.

Here’s a look at the prize:

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And here’s a list of what’s included in each prize bundle:

  • Wheel of Time backpack
  • Signed copy of Redshirts by John Scalzi
  • Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake
  • The Battle of Blood and Ink written by Jared Axelrod and illustrated by Steve Walker
  • Dark Companion by Marta Acosta
  • Existence by David Brin
  • Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  • The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
  • The Eye of the World: Graphic Novel: Volume 2 Based on the novel by Robert Jordan, written by Chuck Dixon, illustrated by Andie Tong
  • Eyes to See by Joseph Nassise
  • Gardens of the Moon by Steven Erikson
  • Girl Genius Omnibus Volume 1 by Phil Foglio and Kaja Foglio
  • Halo: Cryptum by Greg Bear
  • Halo: Glasslands by Karen Traviss
  • Inside Straight edited by George R.R. Martin
  • Johnny Hiro: Half Asian, All Hero written and illustrated by Fred Chao
  • Laddertop: Volume 1 written by Orson Scott Card and Emily Janice Card Art by Honoel A. Ibardolaza
  • Off Armageddon Reef by David Weber
  • The Omen Machine by Terry Goodkind
  • Passion Play by Beth Bernobich
  • Personal Demons by Lisa Desrochers
  • The Way of the Kings by Brandon Sanderson

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You must be 18 or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C. to enter. Promotion begins July 12, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. ET. and ends July 16, 2012, 12:00 p.m. ET. Void in Puerto Rico and wherever prohibited by law. Please see full details and official rules go here. Sponsor: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

YA Collection Sweepstakes

Sign up for the Tor/Forge Newsletter for a chance to win the following collection:

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About our newsletter: Every issue of Tor’s monthly email newsletter features original writing by, and interviews with, Tor authors and editors about upcoming new titles from all Tor and Forge imprints. In addition, we occasionally send out “special edition” newsletters to highlight particularly exciting new projects, programs, or events.

If you’re already a newsletter subscriber, you can enter too. We do not automatically enter subscribers into sweepstakes. We promise we won’t send you duplicate copies of the newsletter if you sign up for the newsletter more than once.

Sign up for your chance to win today!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. You must be 18 or older and a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C. to enter. Promotion begins April 30, 2012 at 12 a.m. ET. and ends June 8, 2012, 11:59 p.m. ET. Void in Puerto Rico and wherever prohibited by law. For Official Rules and to enter, go here. Sponsor: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

Also, don’t forget to check out our other sweepstakes!

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